History

“The phenomenon of a gay men’s chorus is a vital part of the musical fabric of our society. It is not a gimmick to draw a crowd. We have always just wanted to put on great concerts – and make a difference while doing it.”

This issue of the American Choral Review looks at composer Zakaria Paliashvili's setting of Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. Co-authors John A. Graham and Parker Jayne explore Paliashvili's Georgian influences and how his version fell into obscurity after the Russain Revolution.

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A Conversation with Deke Sharon and Josh Habermann

At the opening session of Chorus America’s 2014 Conference, conductor Josh Habermann and a cappella pioneer Deke Sharon talked about new trends in vocal music and breaking down boundaries between the classical and pop worlds.

As a young girl, Abbie Betinis noticed that singing “Caroling, Caroling” during the holidays always brought tears to her grandpa’s eyes. Later she would learn that the famous carol was one of many composed by her great uncle Alfred Burt, who was carrying on a family tradition of carol writing begun by his father, the Rev. Bates Burt. In 2001, Betinis, by then a composer herself, decided to pick up the family carol writing tradition.

In celebration of the Britten centennial in 2013, this issue of American Choral Review features two articles on the music of Benjamin Britten: distinguished scholar Alfred Whittall offers reflections on the composer’s choral writing, and co-authors Thomas Folan and Nancy S. Niemi explore issues of identity in Britten’s Cantata Academica.

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